Trailside Celebrates St. Patrick’s Day.

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Trailside Celebrates St. Patrick’s Day.

Shown above is Dr. Ibarra’s door. Dr. Ibarra was one of the only teachers who decorated their room for St Patrick’s day.

Shown above is Dr. Ibarra’s door. Dr. Ibarra was one of the only teachers who decorated their room for St Patrick’s day.

Heaven Reath

Shown above is Dr. Ibarra’s door. Dr. Ibarra was one of the only teachers who decorated their room for St Patrick’s day.

Heaven Reath

Heaven Reath

Shown above is Dr. Ibarra’s door. Dr. Ibarra was one of the only teachers who decorated their room for St Patrick’s day.

Heaven Reath, Sarah Perry, and Zubair Mahedavi

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Even though this year’s St. Patrick’s day has already passed, students at Trailside can still enjoy looking back on past celebrations. Trailside has its fair share of students who have some sort of tradition for the holiday. While many do at least one thing for the holiday, some lack an understanding of its’ history. Which raises the question, who is Saint Patrick anyway?

Heaven Reath
The picture shows mathematics teacher Mrs. Leek dressed in St. Patrick’s day atrie. Mrs. Leek was one of the few teachers who dressed up for St. Patrick’s day.

According to legend, St. Patrick was originally named Maewyn Succat in 385 AD. Later in life, Succat took on the new name Patricius, a name that originates from the term for “father figure” in Latin. It’s believed he took this name shortly after becoming a priest. What is known for sure is that in 385 AD, St. Patrick was born in Britain. This is also when Britain was apart of the Roman empire. At age sixteen, he was kidnapped and brought to Ireland as a slave. After he either escaped or was released, he became a priest and traveled back to Ireland as a missionary. In Ireland, he was able to convert Druids into Christians. People often credit the luck associated with St. Patrick’s day to the luck St. Patrick had in his conversion efforts.

St. Patrick died on March 17, 461 AD. However, it wouldn’t be for nearly 13 centuries until the holiday would be created. Sometime in the early 17th century, March 17 became the official Christian feast day. While the holiday was originally invented to honor the man who helped the widespread of Christianity through Ireland, it’s evolved since. In fact, the way most people spend St. Patrick’s day has nothing to do with religion at all.

Heaven Reath
Shamrock Shakes are ST. Patrick’s day themed milkshakes by McDonalds. Shamrock shakes are available in select locations from Feb. 21 to March 17.

Lots of people have different traditions on St. Patrick’s Day. While some people have special dinners with their families, others chose something simpler. “Something I make sure I do every year is going to McDonald’s and get a Shamrock Shake. That’s probably the closest thing I have to a St. Patrick’s day tradition,” said 8th grader Lily Hollar. While many people’s celebrations for the holiday tend to fall more on the less extravagant side, some don’t. “Although my family’s usual St. Patrick’s day activities normally include extended family, this year we kept it to immediate family only. I’m a partially Irish person and my family tends to take St. Patrick’s day pretty seriously, so we have these celebrations every year,” said 8th grader Hannah Kennedy.

While this St. Patrick’s day has already happened, students at Trailside shared what they did in the past to celebrate. 7th grader Colin Rizley shared a fond memory. “I remember when my mom used to hide girl scout cookies with a clue, kind of like treasure hunt.” While many have memories of when they were younger involving sweets and leprechauns, people tend to stop continue to make these memories later on in life. “When I was in kindergarten, my teacher used to put green paw prints in the bathroom and say there was a leprechaun. Nowadays, nobody even celebrates it unless they are Irish or they have relatives from that area. I feel like it’s becoming kind of underrated” said 7th grader Dylan Scott.

While the holiday may not be as fun for the students of Trailside as it used to be, they can still enjoy the day with whatever traditions they have. Catholic and Christian feast holidays like this typically have their religious roots ignored in favor of simply becoming an excuse to spend time with family and friends. No matter how you spent St. Patrick’s day this year, or any year before it, hopefully, you were able to do that.